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Sentencing pushed for cop killer's helper

A Judge pushed the sentencing of Megan Mollet back one week after a late memorandum from the prosecution asked for a lengthy prison term. Kitsap County Superior Court Judge Leila Mills Tuesday said she was handed a Memorandum of Authorities minutes after the hearing was to begin in the sentencing of the witness in the killing of Washington State Trooper Tony Radulescu.

Mollet was in the car when Joshua Blake reached over her and shot Radulescu at point-blank range during a traffic stop on Feb. 23. The two then drove to a residence at 3700 Schofield Rd. in Port Orchard. It was there that Mollet told a Kitsap County Sheriff's Office deputy that she had never met a Joshua Blake or spent any time with him the night the trooper was shot.

Mollet was later arrested for lying to police. A 12-member jury found her guilty of rendering criminal assistance and lying to police officers after a three day trial that included multiple law enforcement officers as witness.

The prosecutor's memorandum asks that Mollet serve her prison terms back-to-back instead of concurrently.

Because this was her first criminal offense, Mollet stands to serve up to a year for each crime.

In the memorandum, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Timothy Drury showed multiple instances where first-time offenders like Mollet had served prison time for multiple crimes back-to-back. But Jonathon Morrison, Mollet's defense attorney, told judge Mills that he was not prepared to argue against consecutive sentencing after receiving the memorandum so late before the hearing started and asked for more time to prepare.

Morrison argued a consecutive sentence, instead of a concurrent sentence where Mollet would serve time for both crimes together, was an unusually long sentence for a first-time offender.

The judge sided with Morrison in his request for more time and sentencing for Mollet will now take place June 12.

 

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