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Debris from the dirty depths

In the background, SCUBA diver Peter Walker-Richards heads back into the waters near the Bremerton Boardwalk after bringing up a tangle of traffic cones from the deep.  Walker-Richards was joined by his father and fellow diver Bruce Richards during the Sinclair Inlet shoreline and underwater cleanup on April 20. - Summer Watterson photo
In the background, SCUBA diver Peter Walker-Richards heads back into the waters near the Bremerton Boardwalk after bringing up a tangle of traffic cones from the deep. Walker-Richards was joined by his father and fellow diver Bruce Richards during the Sinclair Inlet shoreline and underwater cleanup on April 20.
— image credit: Summer Watterson photo

Glub, glub, glub.

Clank, clank, clank.

Those were the dominant sounds rising from 30 volunteers at the Port of Bremerton docks during the Sinclair Inlet shoreline and underwater cleanup April 20.

The University of Washington Sea Grant program and the Poulsbo Marine Science Center also had volunteers at the event, educating people about the sea life of Sinclair Inlet.

But the stars of the show were six divers who assisted in bringing up 15 cubic yards of trash which filled two dumpsters. Brought up from the sea floor and surrounding area were road cones, beer bottles, plastic piping, mattresses, a television, a car hood and firework debris.

Volunteer Janet Sedy said she found some fake fingernail and fingernail clippers in the parking lots by the boardwalk.

The event was organized by Don Larson, president of the Kitsap Diving Association and vice president of the Washington Scuba Alliance. Larson called the event a success and thanked all volunteers.

“Any time you remove 15 cubic yards of trash, that means the bay is that much cleaner,” Larson said. “We’re thankful for the volunteers that do show up.”

Several state and local grants and a Kitsap County Surface and Storm Water Management Watershed Mini-grant helped support the cleanup. Other event sponsors include local merchants, the Washington Department of Transportation, Sound Dive Shop of Bremerton, Brem-Air Disposal and the Port of Bremerton.

Bruce Richards and his son Peter Walker-Richards were two of the volunteer divers cleaning up the bottom of the Sinclair Inlet.

“It’s a good experience and it’s good to help clean up,” Richards said after the event.

The Bremerton Boardwalk wasn’t the only place being cleaned in celebration of Earth Day. The shoreline near Highway 304 was being picked up and the Annapolis Boat Launch in Port Orchard had about 40 volunteers, including three divers.

Boy Scout troop No. 1528 of Olalla also planted four redwood trees by the Warren Avenue Bridge in Bremerton on April 19. They also picked up about two 32-gallon bags of trash from the area.

Twice a year on the third Saturday of April and the third Saturday of September there has been a Sinclair Inlet cleanup in Bremerton since 1990. The next cleanup is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2002.

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